History

Events | February 06-15, 2024
Join the Black Histories Edit-a-thon for a series of free, online events throughout Black History Month! No experience necessary! You...
News | Tuesday, October 25, 2022
Awa Hanane Diagne, a research assistant at the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology (IHPST) at...
News | Tuesday, September 20, 2022
New research from an award-winning historian at the University of Toronto will offer rare insight into the unwritten and intertwined...
Network | Project
Malleability and Machines: Glenn Gould and the Technological Self
This article examines how pianist Glenn Gould’s musical ideals and philosophy – which emphasized properties of machines and electronic media...
Network | Project
The Unreliable Nation: Hostile Nature and Technological Failure in the Cold War
In his first book, Jones-Imhotep explores how technological failures shaped the identity of Canada during the Cold War through the...
Network | Researcher Profile
Edward Jones-Imhotep is the Director of the Institute for the History & Philosophy of Science & Technology at the University...
Network | Researcher Profile
Nicole Charles is an assistant professor in the department of historical studies at the University of Toronto Mississauga. Her research focuses on women, gender and sexuality studies, including Caribbean feminisms and Black feminist health science studies. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach in her research, Charles questions issues of care, gendered and racialized risk, technoscience and coloniality in the Black Atlantic.
News | Thursday, March 24, 2022
In 2015, Nicole Charles headed to Barbados to unpack the reasons behind parents’ hesitancy toward the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine....
News | Thursday, March 17, 2022
University of Toronto historian Funké Aladejebi is on a mission to place Black Canadian history at the forefront of academia....
Network | Project
Suspicion and/as Radical (Care): Looking Closer at Vaccine Hesitancy in Postcolonial Barbados
Charles’ examines the caring work of human papillomavirus (HPV) delivery, looking closely into historical antithetical understandings and practices of care.